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Why "Waste Time" in School

November 20, 2014
By Dane Bundy

Why “Waste Time” in School

 

Two years ago I walked outside and stumbled upon a striking image. There, sprawled on the ground (no doubt a fire hazard), were a number of my students eagerly “wasting time” in conversation.

As I approached them, I noticed they were exchanging words with unusual vibrancy. They had books in their hands (philosophical books) by authors like Anselm and Lewis. They were dialoguing about the Trinity!

What have I done right, I thought. How can I patent it?

But, that’s the catch, I hadn’t really done anything. This “waste of time” was all their doing!

I only provided the opportunity. We cut “productive” time out of their busy school day to make room for “unproductive” time, or leisure. Or as James V. Schall puts it: “wasting time.”

As odd as it sounds, history, Scripture, and experience offer compelling reasons for why we should “waste time” in school.

 

Leisure in History

 

Leisure and learning have a rich history as close friends. The word “school” actually comes from the Greek word schole, which means “leisure.” Josef Pieper argues that the great Western thinkers saw leisure as the basis for culture.

The Greek and Roman thinkers drew stark distinctions between work and leisure. A slave who had to work could not afford time for leisure. The liberal arts (or the free arts) provided individuals with the tools and essential knowledge to live a life of learning and deep contemplation.

We can define leisure as time spent on things that are ends to themselves, such as friendship, conversation, and contemplation.

   

Leisure in Scripture

 

God has a word to say on this topic as well. God instituted the Sabbath for man on the seventh day after his own rest and leisure. As outlined for the Jews, the Sabbath was a day specifically marked for time away from work or productivity. It was “wasted time” in rest: the rejuvenation of the mind and body.  It was “wasted time” in leisure: prayer, contemplation, celebration, and worship.

To the modern Christian “wasted time” with God may take the form of Bible reading, meditation, Christian fellowship, and corporate worship. “Be still and know that I am God,” writes the Psalmist. What a much needed exhortation to stop, be silent, and consider the deep things of God!

 

Leisure and Experience

 

In leisure, a strange phenomenon takes place: learning can feel more like joy than work.  Leisure can spark a desire to learn for its own sake.

But, ironically, places of learning are often more characterized by work than leisure and by busyness than contemplation. Administrators, parents, teachers, and students all are busy.

Please don’t hear me say busyness or hard work is bad (God ordained the Jews six days of it). I’m also not saying leisure is easy. Contemplation demands sustained focus.

But what if our students are too busy and too overworked to stop and focus and contemplate? Would you not agree something is awry?

 

Leisure at Cornerstone

 

At Cornerstone, we have sought a number of ways to match leisure once again with learning.

Within the classroom, we discuss and debate ideas, and the students journal on a regular basis. I even designated a corner of my room (furnished with our theatre props) for leisure called Socrates’ Circle. We have it all planned out. When my students think an idea deserves debate or discussion, they shoot up their hands to give the signal. If the timing is right, I return the signal, we cry out “Socrates!”, and rush to the corner!

Parallel to the classroom, we’ve established the Contemplatorium. As the name implies, it is extended time for students and teachers to read, contemplate, and discuss. The students are assigned mentors (CA teachers) who match them with texts to interest and challenge them. There are no grades or exams for this time, and no competition or demand to produce anything. Most of the time it’s marked by silence, unless broken with the exchange of ideas.

 

As I write this post, my students are sprawled across the room. One is lying on the carpet in Socrates’ Circle and another sitting in the rocking chair. If all goes well, much time will be “wasted.”

 

Lyman Mccorkindale says:
May 19, 2015 12:20 PM CST
I have only one thing to say about your article. It's fascinating content with fresh and sound ideas that fit many of my own views.
Matthews says:
November 03, 2017 06:18 AM CST

Such an amazing and a useful post.You are really great at what you are doing here and I would certainly urge you to keep it up. Worth a share.